Islamic Creed | Correct Aqidah

Creed of Islam. Pillars of Iman. Tauhid. Eman. Tawhid. Touheed. Thowheed

38. Ornate tombs and decorated graves

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Throughout much of human history, honoring the dead through elaborate burial rites, ornate tombs and decorated graves, along with festivals of commemoration and adoration has led to great confusion and misguidance in religion. As a result, much of mankind has become involved in some form of grave worship. In fact, the religion of most Chinese, who represent atleast 1/4th of mankind, is ancestor worship. Most of their religious rites are connected with graves and the worship of representations of their ancestors (Pai Tsu)

The graves of holy or saintly men among Hindus, Buddhists and Christians, have become shrines where rites of worship like prayer, sacrifice and pilgrimage are performed on a large scale. With the passage of time, Muslim rulers and the masses strayed away from the fundamental principles of the Islamic creed and began to imitate the pagan practices of the non-Islamic nations around them.

Huge edifices were built over the grave of companions of the Prophet (r) like ‘Alee (Ali), major jurists like Imaam Abu Haneefah and Imaam ash-Shaafi‘ee (Shafi) , and those designated as Sufi “saints” like Junayd and ‘Abdul-Qaadir Al-Jeelaanee (Jailani). In more recent times this practice of building shrines included even the graves of leaders of social movements like Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan.

Today many Muslims travel vast distances in order to perform religious rites of tawaaf around these tombs. Some even make prayer inside and outside of them, and other ‘piously’ bring sacrificial animals to these sites in order to perform the rites of dhabh (ritual sacrifice) there. Most of those who perform rites of worship at graves hold the false belief that the righteous among these dead people are so close to Allaah that all acts of worship done in their vicinity will more likely be accepted by Allaah than if they were done elsewhere. That is, since these dead individuals were blessed, all that is near them must also be blessed. Their tombs and even the land on which they are built must be permeated with the overflow of their surplus blessing.

Because of this belief, grave-worshippers often wipe the walls of graves, then wipe it on themselves in order to collect extra blessings. Often they collect the earth in the vicinity of the graves, in the vain belief that the earth has special healing powers due to the effect of the blessings manifest in those buried there. Many among certain branches of the Shi‘ites (Shias) collect clay from Karbala, where Imaam Hussain was martyred, and bake them to make small tablets on which they prostrate during their salaah (prayer).

Throughout much of human history, honoring the dead through elaborate burial
rites, ornate tombs and decorated graves, along with festivals of commemoration
and adoration has led to great confusion and misguidance in religion. As a result,
much of mankind has become involved in some form of grave worship. In fact,
the religion of most Chinese, who represent between a quarter and a third of
mankind, is ancestor worship. Most of their religious rites are connected with
graves and the worship of representations of their ancestors.60 The graves of holy
or saintly men among Hindus, Buddhists and Christians, have become shrines
where rites of worship like prayer, sacrifice and pilgrimage are performed on a
large scale. With the passage of time, Muslim rulers and the masses strayed away
from the fundamental principles of the Islamic creed and began to imitate the
pagan practices of the non-Islamic nations around them. Huge edifices were built
over the grave of companions of the Prophet (r) like ‘Alee, major jurists like
Imaam Abu Haneefah and Imaam ash-Shaafi‘ee, and those designated as Sufi
“saints” like Junayd and ‘Abdul-Qaadir Al-Jeelaanee. In more recent times this
practice of building shrines included even the graves of leaders of social
movements like Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, and Muhammad
Ahmed, the so-called Mahdi of the Sudan. Today many ignorant Muslims travel
vast distances in order to perform religious rites of tawaaf around these tombs.
Some even make prayer inside and outside of them, and other ‘piously’ bring
sacrificial animals to these cursed sites in order to perform the rites of dhabh
(ritual sacrifice) there. Most of those who perform rites of worship at
graves hold the false belief that the righteous among these dead people are so
close to Allaah that all acts of worship done in their vicinity will more likely be
accepted by Allaah than if they were done elsewhere. That is, since these dead
individuals were blessed, all that is near them must also be blessed. Their tombs
and even the land on which they are built must be permeated with the overflow of
their surplus blessing. Because of this belief, grave-worshippers often wipe the
walls of graves, then wipe it on themselves in order to collect extra blessings.
Often they collect the earth in the vicinity of the graves, in the vain belief that the
earth has special healing powers due to the effect of the blessings manifest in
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Written by S Ibrahim

Mar 1, 2010 at 4:00 pm

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